Chris Ashton

dai11y 28/12/2020

28 December 2020

Alexa Makes Shopping Lists Sharable as Accessibility Feature Alexa allows you to create lists such as shopping lists and todo lists, adding and removing items with your voice. And now, users can ask Alexa to send a given list to a specific contact. Once Alexa confirms it has identified the right person, the recipient gets… [Read More]

dai11y 24/12/2020

24 December 2020

A placeholder is not a label This is your regular reminder from HTMHell that <input type=”text” placeholder=”First name”> is not accessible and requires an associated <label>. Some screen readers will fall back to using the placeholder if a label is missing, but it can’t be relied upon. There are various UI issues with a placeholder-only… [Read More]

dai11y 23/12/2020

23 December 2020

Are your Anchor Links Accessible? Amber Wilson describes the HTML structure she came up with for turning headings into ‘linkable headings’, whose links can be used as anchor links to that specific part of the page. It can be tricky to implement these without making it a noisy or confusing experience for screen reader users…. [Read More]

dai11y 22/12/2020

22 December 2020

iPhones can now automatically recognize and label buttons and UI features for blind users iOS 14 has a new feature, “Screen Recognition”, which is built into VoiceOver. It uses AI to detect interactable elements on the screen, even when such elements aren’t properly labelled / exposed to assistive technology. It has the potential to allow… [Read More]

week11y issue 55

21 December 2020

Apologies for the silence last week – I was having an early Christmas with my family! Your weekly frequent11y newsletter returns below: A plan for accessible maps Benjy Stanton describes how he would design a map service from the ground up, considering the needs of all users. Maps are inherently inaccessible – they require digital… [Read More]

dai11y 21/12/2020

21 December 2020

How we made GOV.UK more accessible A team on GOV.UK analysed a small subset of representative pages to identify any violations of the WCAG 2.1 AA standard. They prioritised each issue by its regularity / likelihood of occurrence and its impact on the user’s ability to use GOV.UK. These were either technical issues, content issues… [Read More]

dai11y 11/12/2020

11 December 2020

More Accessible Skeletons Adrian Roselli describes – quite late on in his blog post – why he thinks skeletons (placeholder areas to display to the user while content is loading) are a bad idea. But he also describes how he would build one if he had to. Some skeletons have aria-busy=”true” markup, which is designed… [Read More]

dai11y 10/12/2020

10 December 2020

Accessible Web Animation: The WCAG on Animation Explained Val Head gives a detailed overview of WCAG animation recommendations. These include: “Pause, Stop, Hide“: provide a way of pausing, stopping or hiding any autoplaying animation that lasts more than 5 seconds. “Three flashes or below threshold“: avoid flashing more than 3 times in a one second… [Read More]

dai11y 09/12/2020

09 December 2020

Here’s What It’s Like To Live With A Tracheostomy Ginny Butcher describes her experience of living with a tracheostomy (or ‘trache’): a tube in her neck, connected to a ventilator to enable her to breathe. She’s completed a master’s degree to become a lawyer, and has done many impressive things such as rock climbing, abseiling,… [Read More]

dai11y 08/12/2020

08 December 2020

A plan for accessible maps Benjy Stanton describes how he would design a map service from the ground up, considering the needs of all users. Maps are inherently inaccessible – they require digital and geographic literacy as well as visual methods of communication, so they should always be seen as an enhancement. Benjy’s tips can… [Read More]

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