Chris Ashton

week11y issue 79

18 June 2021

Emojis and accessibility: How to use them properly Ryan Tan shares some tips for accessible emoji usage, mostly in terms of screen reader support, and covering a mixture of ‘design tips’ vs ‘everyday content’: Design: on buttons, don’t use emojis to replace words. E.g. use “Like” rather than “👍”, which could be ambiguous. Don’t use… [Read More]

dai11y 18/06/2021

18 June 2021

TikTok Adds New Accessibility Overview To Provide Additional Support for Users TikTok adds photosensitivity warnings to its videos, and allows viewers to opt out of viewing them. It’s also educational; warning labels are shown to creators on the specific effects that may trigger photosensitive epilepsy. TikTok also offers auto captions and text-to-speech tools, and the… [Read More]

dai11y 17/06/2021

17 June 2021

This individual shows how he lives his everyday life as a blind person A colleague shared this in our work Slack. Anthony S. Ferraro (asfvsion) demonstrates how he completes everyday tasks as a blind person. He covers the very basics (how to pour a cup of water; by keeping one finger over the rim of… [Read More]

dai11y 16/06/2021

16 June 2021

Whose nine is it anyway? (Feedback on the WCAG 2.2 working draft) This article – which I read mostly for the terrible headline – was written by TPGi, an “accessibility solutions provider”, working with a consortium of big names in a11y. TPGi feel that the 9 new Success Criteria recently proposed for WCAG 2.2 all… [Read More]

dai11y 15/06/2021

15 June 2021

Our development approach for accessible front-end code This guide by the BBC walks through their approach for implementing front-end changes, e.g. implementing a component. Look at the screen reader UX; ask the UX designer for the required documentation if it is missing. It should cover the focus order, the announced content for screen readers, etc…. [Read More]

dai11y 14/06/2021

14 June 2021

Emojis and accessibility: How to use them properly Ryan Tan shares some tips for accessible emoji usage, mostly in terms of screen reader support, and covering a mixture of ‘design tips’ vs ‘everyday content’: Design: on buttons, don’t use emojis to replace words. E.g. use “Like” rather than “👍”, which could be ambiguous. Don’t use… [Read More]

fortnight11y issue 39

11 June 2021

How anyone can make Maps more accessible Google relies on its community of Local Guides to update Google Maps information by, for example, inputting whether a restaurant has tables suitable for people who use wheelchairs. These guides share some actionable tips for crowd-sourcing information to benefit everyone, particularly people with disabilities: An accessibility checklist can… [Read More]

week11y issue 78

11 June 2021

DWP Accessibility Manual The Department for Work and Pensions’ Digital team has written an Accessibility Manual, off the back of some user research the department conducted. The accompanying blog post by Head of Accessibility Craig Abbott describe how they hope it will consolidate key information in one place. It is open source and accepting contributions…. [Read More]

dai11y 11/06/2021

11 June 2021

Testing fonts for accessibility Colin Shanley shares the 3 things to bear in mind when choosing a font: Imposters: specific letter shapes that look similar to other shapes can be difficult or impossible to differentiate. For example, lowercase L, uppercase i and the number 1. The image below shows Gill Sans on the left (bad)… [Read More]

dai11y 10/06/2021

10 June 2021

We need to talk about WCAG This article is written by Rian Rietveld (my second article in a row by this author, by pure coincidence!) 97.4% of home pages have detectable WCAG 2 failures. Rian concludes that this is a failure in the way we communicate and teach WCAG, which she thinks is partly down… [Read More]

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